Mark Twain

Me and Sam

With only a few days to spend in Connecticut; the top item on my list was to visit the home of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, aka Mark Twain: the greatest humorist the United States has produced. I have long felt an affinity to his work. He would definitely be on my list of 5 people to bring back from the dead for dinner.

“The Vagabond Instinct was strong in me”. “All I do know or feel, is, that I am wild with impatience to move-move–Move! Curse the endless delays! I wish I never had to stop anywhere a month.”
-Letter from Samuel Clemens to his mother
and family, June 1, 1867

Mark Twain House

The Mark Twain House & Museum has restored the author’s Hartford, Connecticut, home, where the author and his family lived from 1874 to 1891. Twain wrote his most important works during the years he lived there, including Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.

Fun Fact: Twain was born shortly after an appearance of Halley’s comet and he predicted that he would “go out with it” as well, dying the day after the comet made its closest approach to Earth.

Sunapee, NH

Lake Sunapee

In one beautiful trip on a ski lift, I got to take in the beauty of both the Mountain and the Lake named after Sunapee. Town, lake, and mountain share the name Sunapee, which comes from the Algonquin Indian words suna, meaning goose, and apee, meaning lake. The Indians called the area Goose Lake because it was a favorite spot of wild geese.

The summit of Mt. Sunnapee

League of NH Craftsmen

One of my favorite things to do when visiting any area is attending local craft fairs. The League of NH Craftsmen hosts one of the finest I have attended. I especially liked watching the crafts folk creating their art.

The League’s story begins in the mid-1920s when Mrs. Mary Coolidge and A. Cooper Ballentine joined forces to promote craft in New Hampshire. By 1932, The League of New Hampshire Arts and Crafts had been established, and the first official League shop was opened in Wolfeboro. The following year, the first Craftsmen’s Fair was held, making it the oldest craft fair in the country.

League of NH Craftsmen

One of my favorite things to do when visiting any area is attending local craft fairs. The League of NH Craftsmen hosts one of the finest I have attended. I especially liked watching the crafts folk creating their art.

The League’s story begins in the mid-1920s when Mrs. Mary Coolidge and A. Cooper Ballentine joined forces to promote craft in New Hampshire. By 1932, The League of New Hampshire Arts and Crafts had been established, and the first official League shop was opened in Wolfeboro. The following year, the first Craftsmen’s Fair was held, making it the oldest craft fair in the country.

Littleton, NH

Connecticut River Covered Bridge

One of my favorite towns in New Hampshire is nestled between the northern White Mountains and the Connecticut River, the town of Littleton, NH, is equal parts business and shopping hub and outdoor escape. It’s been named one of the best places to live in America. It’s downtown has won big accolades as well; given Littleton’s lively arts scene, summertime festivals and street performers, local boutiques and shops . With its ideal location in the shadow of the mountains and along the river, Littleton prides itself on being a walkable community, both around town and on a 22-mile network of hand-built trails.

Flume Gorge

Flume Gorge

Its name sounds a bit like an amusement park ride, but Flume Gorge in Lincoln, New Hampshire, is not an attraction any engineer dreamed up. Powerful natural forces — molten earth, ice, flowing water and frost — have shaped this fascinating chasm: a highlight of New Hampshire’s Franconia Notch State Park.

Imagine stumbling upon this geologic wonder one day while you were out fishing. That’s what happened in 1808 to 93-year-old “Aunt” Jess Guernsey. Even her own family was dubious when she described what she’d found. But soon, she convinced others to have a look. And even without the benefit of social media, word traveled fast about this spectacular sight. The first tourists came by stagecoach to see Flume Gorge, and people haven’t stopped visiting since.

Goffstown, NH

I was hankering for some Eggs Benedict this morning, so decided to check out Goffstown which is not far from where I’m camped. It’s a very quaint area with several restaurants and a few shops.

Goffstown was incorporated in 1761. This town started as a part of Massachusetts, and was known as Narragansett Number 4, Piscataquog (so glad I don’t have to pronounce that) Village, and then Shovestown (I’m curious if there was a lot of shoving in Shovestown). before installation of the New Hampshire provincial government.

In 1748, the area was granted to new settlers, including Colonel John Goffe who fought in the French and Indian Wars, worked for Governor Wentworth as a surveyor, and became judge of probate for Hillsborough County.

Highland House Museum

Highland House Museum

The Highland House Museum occupies one of Truro’s best known landmarks, the Highland House, a seasonal hotel built on the Highlands in 1907. Located near the Highland Light in North Truro, the museum building is a classic example of a turn-of-the-century summer resort hotel.

I visited the Museum for a look inside the lives of the people of Truro and the Outer Cape. There were permanent exhibits about the Indigenous People who lived here for hundreds of years before the arrival of the Europeans. I was able to travel back to a time when local residents devoted themselves to the salt mill industry, the railroad, and domestic crafts, such as weaving and embroidery. I discovered a collection of art that showcases a deep reservoir of talent that reflects an enduring admiration for the natural beauty of this area.

Highland Light

Three Sisters Lit the Way

Three Sisters Lights – Retired

In 1838 the US Government took action to reduce the number of shipwrecks along the dangerous Cape Cod Atlantic coast by establishing the Nauset Light. To make the signal easily recognizable, three separate lanterns were set on small brick towers about 150 feet apart. Unfortunately, the brick “Three Sisters” were built too close to the eroding cliff which threatened to undermine them. In 1892 they were replaced by wooden towers built farther back from the edge.

From 1923 until 1981 the Nauset Light carried on the tradition of the retired “Three Sisters” by flashing three times every ten seconds. The present light flashes an alternating red and white pattern

Nauset Lighthouse

South County Museum Forge

Blacksmith Forge

Narragansett’s South County Museum’s Blacksmith Forge is an exhibit as well as a fully functioning working forge that includes an extensive collection of blacksmithing tools including bellows that came from the famous Fayerweather Blacksmith Shop in Kingston, Rhode Island. Joshua Kelly, the resident blacksmith, along with a team of several local blacksmiths, work on a regular basis throughout the season to provide lessons and live demonstrations.

What’s wrong with this weather vane?